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Browse: Miscellaneous > World War I Desolation in Europe, 1918

5 Total Results, Showing Results from 1 to 5


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Image   M-W-W-01
Yearunknown
TextEntire orchards were chopped down when the German armies were driven from occupied portions of Northern France last year. This picture is one of a set of official photographs made for the French government, showing the thoroughness with which this destruction was carried out by the Germans. In many instances the Germans found themselves short of time, and instead of cutting the trees down, merely hacked, or girdled the trunk so that the tree, if left alone, would bleed to death. The French, fully aware of the food value of their highly prized orchards, soon found a method of circumventing the Hun, and saved many girdled trees by having squadrons of soldiers equipped with first aid materials, such as tar or cement, accompany the advancing French soldiers for the purpose of saving as many orchards as possible by binding the trees and staunching the flow of sap through the injured trunks.

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Image   M-W-W-02
Yearunknown
TextGermans destroy French sugar mills. Sugar production in France has fallen to less than 25% of the pre-war output. This picture of a wrecked sugar mill shows one of the principal reasons for the decline. When German troops retreated from occupied portions of France they took pains to destroy virtually all of the sugar mills that would otherwise have assisted the French in maintaining their sugar stocks. That first wave of Teuton invasion was stopped in France after the Germans had established a battle line that cut off 203 of the 213 French sugar mills, as well as much land that had produced sugar beets. In some of the German retreats the mills were left in such shape as to permit their operation. The official sugar production figures indicate the extent of the destruction; and emphasize the French sugar needs which must be filled by American aid. The year of 1912-13, 213 French mills turned out 967,440 short tons of sugar. For 1916-17, 65 mills produced only 204,405 short tons. To further complicate the French sugar situation the yield per acre of sugar beets decreased from 13.30 short tons per acre in 1912-13 to 11.70 short tons per acre in 1916-17. Supplying France from American stocks saved the situation, the U.S. Food Administration has announced.

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Image   M-W-W-03
Yearunknown
TextDemonstration of how the women of England are solving the labor problem. Women loading loose straw.

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Image   M-W-W-04
Yearunknown
TextUnidentified women with straw and wagon.

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Image   M-W-W-05
Yearunknown
TextUnidentified woman sitting on rubble.

   

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